Articles taggés avec ‘European Union member state’

EU Funding: Budget report 2007 confirms better management but warns time is running out for unspent funds

Vendredi 27 juin 2008

The latest data on EU spending shows, once again, the growing trend for higher investment in long-term economic progress and employment

The Financial Report 2007 also reveals how the first budget of the new programming period 2007-2013 and of an enlarged EU-27 saw the share of funds for new members increase, while the biggest overall recipients remained the same as 2006. High spending (almost the entire 2007 budget left EU coffers) confirms active budget management is bearing fruit. However lessons for future spending must be drawn from the unspent funds on which Member States lost out last year. Ensuring the continuous, effective absorption of all funds is vital.

Out of the €114 bn spent in 2007, a massive €44 bn (38.4%) went on growth and employment – a 3.7% rise on 2006 and higher than funds for farming, where market expenditure and direct payments enjoyed almost a €43 bn share (37.4%). 2007 also saw 10.5% (€12 bn) of EU cash go on rural development, fisheries and environment and over 5% (€7.3 bn) was spent on EU actions abroad.

Most of the 2007 funds - over 92%, or €105 bn – were spent on the ground in the EU’s 27 Member States with the four biggest recipients taking almost half of the total budget. France held on to its position of overall top recipient, with €13.9 bn, followed by Spain (€12.8 bn), Germany (€12.5 bn) and Italy (€11.3 bn). The EU-12 made steady ground with their share of spending growing from 12.9% in 2006 to 17% in 2007 –five and a half billion more. Poland benefited most, receiving €7.8 bn (7.4%).

The division of payments for agriculture and cohesion show a similar picture to 2006. For farming and rural development, France stayed in first place, taking more than €10 bn - nearly 20% of agricultural spending. Spain followed with €7 bn (12.9%) then Germany with €7 bn (12.8%). Italy and the UK were next in line with €6 bn (11%) and 4.2 bn (7.9%) respectively. Of the EU-12, Poland received the biggest share, €3.1 bn (5.8%). As in 2006, the top cohesion policy beneficiary was Spain, taking €5.4 bn or 14.7%. Greece moved up to second place with €4.6 bn (12.4%), followed by Italy and Germany. Poland also moved up the cohesion policy ladder, ahead of Portugal, France and the UK.

However, 2007 also saw €227m lost in unspent funds from the previous programming period (2000-2006). Under the n+2 rule, Member States lose committed money that is not claimed as a payment within two years. The highest 2007 loss was €66m for Germany, but the largest share lost was in Luxembourg: €3.5m - nearly a quarter of their funding - and the Netherlands which lost €19.9m, over 4% of its total funding. The only EU-12 losers were Slovenia (€0.2m) and Slovakia (€1.4m). From the EU-15 only Ireland and Finland avoided any losses.

Speaking to the media, Commissioner Grybauskaitė stressed how the loss of funds in 2007 serves as a harsh warning for next year.

Although the budget 2007 grew by €8 bn (+6.9% on 2006), it remained stable in terms of EU wealth, staying at 0.93% of EU GNI like the previous year. The nominal increase was mainly due to the arrival of Romania and Bulgaria.

 
  Source:
Press Room - European Commission

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EU Funding: MEPs give green light for new EU waste legislation with binding 2020 targets

Mercredi 18 juin 2008

The EU will have new waste legislation which includes targets for re-use and recycling of waste to be attained by 2020 after MEPs adopted amendments

The directive sets out rules on recycling and requires Member States to draw up binding national programmes for waste prevention. Waste prevention targets will be considered by the Commission in the future. Incineration of waste will be categorised as a recovery operation rather than disposal, provided it meets a certain energy efficiency standard.
The second-reading agreement with Council adopted by MEPs sets the definitions and ground rules for all the other pieces of EU legislation relative to waste - it therefore has a direct or indirect impact on them all.

The compromise was supported by many speakers during yesterday’s debate though several speakers would have liked to achieve more. Several MEPs were unhappy that the compromise was too weak and criticised that no binding waste prevention target is included or would have preferred to have even tougher targets for recycling and re-use.

Inclusion of targets for re-use and recycling

MEPs managed in including in the directive a new article on re-use and recycling targets, which was foreseen neither by the original Commissions’ proposal nor by the Common Position. The compromise states that Member states “shall take the necessary measures designed to achieve the following targets”:

- by 2020 for re-use and recycling of waste materials such as paper, metal glass from households and similar waste streams: 50 %
- by 2020 for non hazardous construction and demolition waste: 70 %

A special target for manufacturing and industrial waste, as demanded by MEPs is not included in the compromise but the Commission has to examine the targets by 2020 and eventually reinforce them or consider setting targets for other waste streams.

Waste prevention is reinforced - targets to be considered in the future

The new directive will oblige Member States to establish waste management plans and waste prevention programmes with waste prevention objectives 5 years after entry into force of the directive. Further to this duty the compromise includes a new article on waste prevention. The Commission shall propose - if appropriate - by end 2014 the setting of waste prevention and decoupling objectives for 2020.

Incineration

For MEPs, a crucial aim is to reduce the amount of landfill and incineration, both of which cause pollution. Members were divided over whether incineration of municipal solid waste should be regarded as a “disposal” or a “recovery” operation, the latter one being a better option regarding the waste hierarchy. In the vote, MEPs backed the Commission and Council position that it should be categorised as recovery, provided it meets a certain energy efficiency standards (energy efficiency formula in annex II to the directive). According to the Commission this has the effect that only the most energy efficient existing municipal solid waste incinerators will be classified as recovery installations.

MEPs also managed to include a revision after 6 years of the energy efficiency provisions into the compromise.

Member States to stick to binding five-stage hierarchy

The five-stage waste hierarchy, which is designed to prevent and reduce waste production, is made more certain and comprehensive and moved to a more prominent place. The hierarchy lays down an order of preference for waste operations: prevention, re-use, recycling, other recovery operations and, as a last resort, safe and environmentally sound disposal. Member States shall treat it “as a priority order”, in waste prevention and management legislation rather than as a “guiding principle” as proposed by Council. Departing from the hierarchy may be possible where it is justified by “life cycle” thinking on the overall impacts of the generation and management of such waste.

The directive includes furthermore a definition on by-products and of the “end-of-waste” status. It introduces an extended producer responsibility and asks Member States to take measures to encourage the separate collection of bio-waste.

Some figures

The 1.8 billion tonnes of waste generated each year in Europe works out at 3.5 tonnes per person. This consists mainly of waste from households, commercial activities (e.g., shops, restaurants, hospitals etc.), industry (e.g. pharmaceutical companies, clothes manufacturers etc.), agriculture (e.g. slurry), construction and demolition projects, mining and quarrying activities and from energy generation.

Municipal waste generation averages 530kg per person per year, an average that masks significant differences among Member States. For example, per capita waste generation is 300 to 350 kg per annum in the EU-10 Member States, but around 570 kg in the EU-15.

In 2005, 49% of EU municipal waste was disposed of through landfill, 18% was incinerated and 27% recycled or composted.

 
  Source:
European Parliament

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EU Funding: Commission provides more humanitarian aid to fight acute malnutrition in the Sahel

Mardi 3 juin 2008
 
 

 European funds

Related EU Grant Loans Programme(s):
 Grants for development actions in the framework of Cotonou agreement between the ACP countries and the EU member States

The European Commission has allocated an additional €5 million to reduce acute malnutrition and mortality in West Africa’s Sahel region

The aid targets the most vulnerable – in particular an estimated 1.3 million acutely malnourished under-five as well as five million pregnant and breast-feeding women. The countries covered are Burkina Faso, Chad, Mali, Mauritania and Niger as well as the Sahel regions in the north of Benin, Côte d’Ivoire, Guinea, Nigeria and Togo. The €5 million is in addition to the €25 million already made available in June last year (see IP/07/785) and the extra €5 million allocated for further food aid in the Sahel this year. The recent massive global increase in food prices has further intensified the pressure on the most vulnerable groups in a region chronically prone to crisis.

While responding to immediate needs, the Commission’s humanitarian aid in the Sahel complements the longer-term European Development Fund which aims, among other things, to help the Sahel countries achieve the Millennium Development Goals of reducing hunger and poverty and infant and maternal mortality. Child mortality in the Sahel is one of the highest in the world and malnutrition is associated with six out of ten child deaths – or 300,000 children under the age of five dying of malnutrition or related causes every year.

The Commission’ approach aims to manage future external shocks better. Regarding children, the aim is to act before the severe malnutrition stage by treating infants that are moderately malnourished. The Sahel plan finances ready-to-use therapeutic food and medical care as well as the provision of treated mosquito nets, training for health workers, malnutrition prevention programmes and support to local systems to detect malnourished children earlier.

In Niger, Commission-funded humanitarian projects have helped to lower the overall Global Acute Malnutrition rate in malnourished children, a key humanitarian indicator, from well over 15% in 2005 to 10% in 2007.

All funds are channelled through the Humanitarian Aid department (ECHO), under the responsibility of Commissioner Louis Michel. The projects are implemented by non-governmental relief organisations, specialised UN agencies and the Red Cross/Red Crescent movement. ECHO has a regional support office in Senegal’s capital, Dakar, and field experts in Niger and Burkina Faso. They closely follow developments in the humanitarian situation, play an active role in the local coordination of relief efforts and monitor the use of the Commission’s relief funds.

The Commission gives particular attention to improving the linkage between relief and development assistance to boost the long-term sustainability of humanitarian aid and to mainstream humanitarian concerns into development aid planning. ECHO therefore coordinates closely with the Commission services responsible for development policies and programmes, notably in the context of the 10th European Development Fund (EDF). All the relevant 10th EDF country strategy papers now include measures to respond to nutritional insecurity in the Sahel.

 
  Source:
Press room - European Commission

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EU Funding: “EU WINDOW” China-EU language exchange programme

Lundi 2 juin 2008

On June 2 the Commissioner for Multilingualism, Mr. Leonard Orban, and the Vice Minister of Education of China, Mr. Zhang Xinsheng, will officially launch the China-EU Language Exchange Programme, entitled “EU Window”

There will be a launching ceremony on June 2 2008 at 5pm at the President’s Gallery of the Berlaymont. The “EU Window” is a four-year project (2009-2013) presented on the occasion of the 10th China-EU Summit (November 2007) and sponsored by the Chinese Government. It will provide opportunities for 200 European school teachers of Chinese language as well as 400 school headmasters from Member States to enhance their Chinese proficiency and the understanding of Chinese culture.

The first phase of the Programme EU WINDOW will last for two years and will consist of two activities:

Summer training for 50 Chinese Language teachers from EU member states

A ten day study visit of 100 School Headmasters and Education Administrators from EU member states.

Participants will be responsible for their own international travel expenses with other expenses in China being borne by China.

Background

In the first edition of the China-EU language scholarship scheme (carried out in 2007) targeted at students, approximately 100 European students received scholarships to study Chinese in China. Most of students came from Poland (23), Germany (17), Italy (15) and Belgium (8).

In the context of EU-China structural dialogue in the field of education and culture a first technical meeting between representatives of the Commission and the Chinese MoE took place on 31 January 2008 in Brussels. The parties agreed on 3 main priority subjects (language teaching, joint PhDs and education through sport) to be developed into cooperation activities in the two forthcoming years.

The first activity will be the organisation of a conference on languages to be held in Beijing in March 2009 which should coincide with the visit of Commissioner Orban to China. In order to prepare the conference a steering group is being created. It will be made up of Chinese and European language experts.

China continues to be among the best performing countries under Erasmus Mundus(education mobility programmes). 450 Chinese students (out of a total of approx. 4000) have benefited or are benefiting from scholarships to study in Europe and 20 Chinese universities participate in partnerships with Erasmus Mundus consortia.

 
  Source:
Press room - European Commission
 
     

Eu funding : Boosting a European Single Labour Market for Researchers

Mardi 27 mai 2008
 
 

 European funds

Related EU Grant Loans Programme(s):
 New framework programme for research and technology aiming at better exploiting research capacities in Europe and transforming scientific results into new products, processes and services.

The Commission proposes a new partnership with Member States

In the Communication “Better careers and more mobility: a European Partnership for Researchers “, the European Commission seeks a partnership with Member States to ensure that the necessary human resources are available to sustain and enhance the contribution of science and technology to a knowledge-based European economy. Europe faces growing global competition for the best talents and demographic challenges. The aim of the partnership is to align and focus the efforts of individual Member States. Joint priority actions should make the EU a more attractive place for researchers, and allow researchers to be more mobile between countries, institutions, and between the academic and private sectors. Key areas for action are the systematic opening up of recruitment, meeting the social security and pension needs of mobile researchers, providing fair employment and working conditions, and ensuring that researchers have the right training and skills.

In many Member States, there is still limited competition-based recruitment in the public sector. Short-term contracts are the norm for young researchers and advancement can often be based on seniority not performance. Many researchers are also trained in a traditional academic way which does not equip them for the needs of the modern knowledge economy where connections between industry and public research institutions are increasingly important. Today’s researchers may need to manage intellectual property, conduct multi-disciplinary projects or start up their own company.

It is proposed that the partnership should make a commitment to achieving by the end of 2010 rapid, measurable progress to:

* systematically open recruitment by research institutions to all European researchers ;
* meet the social security and supplementary pensions needs of mobile researchers;
* provide attractive employment and working conditions, such as improved contractual terms, salaries and opportunities for career development;
* ensure researchers have the necessary skills to turn knowledge into results including by creating stronger links between universities and industry.

Coordinated action in these areas between the Commission and the Member States, alongside renewed efforts on existing initiatives such as the European Charter for Researchers and Code of Conduct for the Recruitment of Researchers, would help to create a genuine European labour market for researchers. This will balance the supply and demand for researchers, boost productivity growth through better job matching, increase knowledge transfer and facilitate the development of centres of excellence throughout the EU. It will also create better international connections for collaborative research and the economic exploitation of research results, and help to create more attractive conditions for industrial investment in research.

At the end of the first stage of the partnership in 2010 an overall evaluation of the situation and results from actions by the partnership will be made and the need for further EU action to address specific outstanding issues will be considered.

Background

The Communication is one of five policy initiatives planned by the Commission to follow up the 2007 Green Paper “The European Research Area: New Perspectives”. The results of the public consultation following the Green Paper suggested that a single labour market for researchers should be amongst the top priorities for action at EU level.

 
  Source:
Press Room - European Commission
 
  More information:
  Communication

Eu funding : Soaring food prices: investment in agriculture needed in developing countries

Lundi 26 mai 2008

In adopting a resolution on rising food prices in the EU and the developing countries, MEPs say that priority should be given to investment in agriculture, aquaculture, rural development and agribusinesses in developing countries.

Fairer international trade rules and an assessment of the effects of speculation on food prices are also underlined by MEPs. On agro-fuels, the Parliament wants production to be linked to strong sustainability criteria and to see second‑generation bioenergy developed.

Right to food

The EP reaffirms the right to food and the need to improve access for all people at all times to enough food for an active, healthy life. Two billion people still live in dire poverty and 850 million human beings are hungry daily. The resolution was adopted with 485 votes in favour 52 against and 7 abstentions.

The Council should step up its commitments to the Millennium Development Goals by adopting an EU MDG Agenda for Action at the June European Council. The House invites the Commission to analyse the effect of speculation on food prices and to come up with appropriate measures.

Sustainable food production

Analysing the discrepancies between farmgate prices and those charged by the major retailers should be done by Commission and the Member States. An impact assessment of the role of retailers in the food chain, as retail food prices is also called by MEPs.

The current EU cereal stocks would last only 30 days, and questions whether our food stocks are at the right level, says the resolution which calls for better forecasting of agricultural output.

Priority needs to be given to food over fuels and biofuel production should be linked to strong sustainability criteria. The House accepts that EU subsidisation of crops intended for biofuel production is no longer justified, but emphasises that only 2-3% of EU agricultural land is currently being used for this kind of production and media reports blaming biofuels for the current food crisis are exaggerated as far as the EU is concerned.

MEPs call on the Commission and the Member States to do more to promote the use and production of second‑generation bio-energy.

The current crisis demands an immediate and thorough discussion among the EU institutions and the Member States on the role that modern biotechnology can play in ensuring the continued production of food at reasonable prices, says the resolution.

Better development policies

The House calls for an urgent and substantial increase in investment in agriculture, aquaculture, rural development and agribusinesses in developing countries, focused on poor farmers and small‑scale farming. 75% of the world’s poor population lives in rural areas, but that only 4% of official development assistance (ODA) is dedicated to agriculture.

Small farmers in poor countries, who are mainly women, need to have access to land, financial services and credit, high-yield seeds, irrigation systems and fertilisers, says the resolution. MEPs call on the EIB to investigate possibilities for the immediate setting up of a guarantee fund in support of national micro-credit and loan schemes and risk-hedging schemes that operate close to the needs of local food producers.

EU Member States and the international community are asked to meet the extraordinary emergency appeal of the World Food Programme to assist it in facing up to the new challenges in the fight against hunger.

 
  Source:
European Parliament

Eu funding : Soaring food prices: investment in agriculture needed in developing countries

Lundi 26 mai 2008

In adopting a resolution on rising food prices in the EU and the developing countries, MEPs say that priority should be given to investment in agriculture, aquaculture, rural development and agribusinesses in developing countries.

Fairer international trade rules and an assessment of the effects of speculation on food prices are also underlined by MEPs. On agro-fuels, the Parliament wants production to be linked to strong sustainability criteria and to see second‑generation bioenergy developed.

Right to food

The EP reaffirms the right to food and the need to improve access for all people at all times to enough food for an active, healthy life. Two billion people still live in dire poverty and 850 million human beings are hungry daily. The resolution was adopted with 485 votes in favour 52 against and 7 abstentions.

The Council should step up its commitments to the Millennium Development Goals by adopting an EU MDG Agenda for Action at the June European Council. The House invites the Commission to analyse the effect of speculation on food prices and to come up with appropriate measures.

Sustainable food production

Analysing the discrepancies between farmgate prices and those charged by the major retailers should be done by Commission and the Member States. An impact assessment of the role of retailers in the food chain, as retail food prices is also called by MEPs.

The current EU cereal stocks would last only 30 days, and questions whether our food stocks are at the right level, says the resolution which calls for better forecasting of agricultural output.

Priority needs to be given to food over fuels and biofuel production should be linked to strong sustainability criteria. The House accepts that EU subsidisation of crops intended for biofuel production is no longer justified, but emphasises that only 2-3% of EU agricultural land is currently being used for this kind of production and media reports blaming biofuels for the current food crisis are exaggerated as far as the EU is concerned.

MEPs call on the Commission and the Member States to do more to promote the use and production of second‑generation bio-energy.

The current crisis demands an immediate and thorough discussion among the EU institutions and the Member States on the role that modern biotechnology can play in ensuring the continued production of food at reasonable prices, says the resolution.

Better development policies

The House calls for an urgent and substantial increase in investment in agriculture, aquaculture, rural development and agribusinesses in developing countries, focused on poor farmers and small‑scale farming. 75% of the world’s poor population lives in rural areas, but that only 4% of official development assistance (ODA) is dedicated to agriculture.

Small farmers in poor countries, who are mainly women, need to have access to land, financial services and credit, high-yield seeds, irrigation systems and fertilisers, says the resolution. MEPs call on the EIB to investigate possibilities for the immediate setting up of a guarantee fund in support of national micro-credit and loan schemes and risk-hedging schemes that operate close to the needs of local food producers.

EU Member States and the international community are asked to meet the extraordinary emergency appeal of the World Food Programme to assist it in facing up to the new challenges in the fight against hunger.

 
  Source:
European Parliament

Eu funding : 25 May 2008 – International Missing Children’s Day

Lundi 26 mai 2008

For the fourth consecutive year, the European Commission is supporting on 25 May the International Missing Children’s Day, organised by the European Federation for Missing and Sexually Exploited Children.

The main purpose of this day is to encourage European citizens and the whole world not to forget all the children that are missing. Vice-President Barrot took part today in the presentation of the first Annual Report of Missing Children Europe, a European federation bringing together 21 NGOs active in 15 Member States in the fight against the disappearance and sexual abuse of children.

Also today, the Commission published the results of the first Eurobarometer survey focusing on young people aged 15 to 18. The survey reveals that the main concerns of young European citizens are “violence” against children and “the fight against sexual exploitation”. Mr Barrot confirmed that both of these are priorities for the European Commission.

Since the launch of the Communication “Towards an EU Strategy on the Rights of the Child” on 4 July 2006, the European Commission has worked ceaselessly in this area. The Communication is the practical expression of genuine political commitment and proposes the introduction of a comprehensive European strategy for the effective promotion and protection of the rights of the child within the framework of the European Union’s internal and external policies, and for supporting Member States’ efforts in this connection.

Among these priorities, the Commission is giving particular attention to rapid implementation of a European missing children helpline and to the development of a missing children alert system in each Member State.

The European Commission has reserved the number 116 000 as the European missing children helpline. To date, only six Member States have made any progress in this area: Belgium, Denmark, Greece, Hungary, the Netherlands and Portugal.

Another priority for the Commission is to put in place national missing children alert systems for cases of abduction where the child is in real danger and to develop links between national systems in cross-border cases. Progress is also slow in this area. It is essential that real advances be made in the coming months.
To show solidarity with all parents and missing children, Mr Barrot asked all European Commission staff to express their support for families affected by a disappearance by wearing a “forget-me-not” flower.

 
  Source:
Press Room - European Commission
 
   

European Commission makes available €4.5 million for the EU Assistance Mission to the Justice System in Albania (EURALIUS II)

Mercredi 21 mai 2008
 
 

The European Commission makes available €4.5 million for the new European Assistance Mission to the Justice System in Albania (EURALIUS II) to assist the Albanian Ministry of Justice and judicial institutions

It aims at developing an independent, impartial, efficient, professional, transparent and modern justice system, therefore contributing to the restoring of people’s confidence in their institutions and to the consolidation of democracy and rule of law in the country.

Over a period of 30 months, EURALIUS II will focus on the areas of Justice Organisation and Justice Reform, Inter-Institutional Dialogue, Improvement of management capacities of the Judiciary and the Ministry of Justice; Improvement of the judicial budget administration and planning; Law Drafting and Legal Approximation; Penitentiary Issues; Enforcement of Rulings; Court Administration and Case Management, Criminal Justice. EURALIUS II is also mandated to take a coordination and observation function in the area of land administration and immovable property rights.

The launch event of EURALIUS II was opened by speeches of the Minister of Justice, the President of the High Court and the Deputy Chairman of the High Council of Justice. The Head of the Mission, Roland Miklau presented the mission’s newly recruited team, consisting of 9 long-term international experts from different EU Member States, 3 local experts and a number of local administrative staff.

The project is implemented by the Austrian Federal Ministry of Justice in consortium with the German Federal Ministry of Justice.

 
  Source:
EC Delegation to Albania

EU reaches out to promote flexicurity approach in the Member States

Lundi 19 mai 2008

The European Commission today launched an initiative to help put the EU’s flexicurity approach – balancing flexibility in the job market with employment security for workers – into practice at national level

This ‘Mission for Flexicurity’ aims to reach out to workers, employers and others through a series of country visits over the next two months. The initiative follows a decision by Member States at the Informal Employment Council in Brdo in January 2008. It will kick off in France today, followed by events in Sweden, Finland, Poland and Spain. Results will be presented in December 2008.

The Mission for Flexicurity aims to raise awareness and understanding of the common principles of flexicurity agreed on at the EU Summit in December 2007 following a Commission Communication in June 2007, so as to aid their implementation in the Member States. The Mission will be led by Commissioner Špidla and Gérard Larcher, former French labour minister. It consists of seven members, including workers’ and employers’ representatives; the Slovene EU presidency; the forthcoming French presidency; and the Commission.

The team will visit five countries to discuss the state of play in implementing the flexicurity principles with all relevant stakeholders. The following Member States have volunteered to receive the Mission between May and July 2008: France (19 May); Sweden (2 June); Finland (6 June); Poland (23 June); Spain (date to be confirmed).

As part of a mutual learning perspective, these visits will also give the opportunity to other Member States, as well as to other relevant participants, to take part in the discussions. The timetable and progress reports following the country visits will appear on a dedicated Commission website.

The work of the Mission should help Member States to report as part of their National Reform Programmes in Autumn 2008 on national implementation of the flexicurity principles (so-called national ‘pathways’). To that end, the Mission will present a draft report in October 2008 to Employment Ministers followed by a final Report in December 2008, after having consulted the European Parliament, the Economic and Social Committee, the Committee of the Regions, the social partners and other stakeholders. This report will highlight the various policy approaches in the Member States and aim at proposing concrete suggestions to encourage the successful implementation of flexicurity policies.

What is flexicurity?

Flexicurity is a comprehensive approach to labour market policy which combines sufficient flexibility in contractual arrangements – to allow firms and employees to cope with change - with the provision of security for workers to stay in their job, or be able to find a new one quickly with the assurance of an adequate income in between jobs. This is possible through lifelong learning, active labour market policies and high levels of social protection.

In today’s labour markets, traditional kinds of job security are not always sustainable and do not always constitute the right solution; people change jobs more often, sometimes because they want to and sometimes because they have to. In this context, new kinds of security are needed, so that workers can change from one job to another job in a safe and successful way, and acquire new skills. Similarly, the different national contractual arrangements should ensure that companies can adapt to changing market circumstances, and that they are not inhibited from offering permanent employment because of the difficulties they might face should circumstances change and a workforce reduction be considered.

 
  Source:
Press room - European Commission
 
  More information:
Mission for flexicurity website